Location

Hong Kong Conventional & Exhibition Centre

Source Publication

IVETA 2000 Conference Proceedings

Description

This paper focuses on the governance framework in relation to the decision-making process which designs, moulds and formulates the policy on vocational education and training (VET) to meet the needs of various industrial and commercial sectors in Hong Kong. There has been a long history of an apparently close relationship among government, businessmen and academics who form a tripartite alliance in making decisions on VET within the framework of the government’s co-optation strategies. Such a triple alliance may be regarded as a necessary and desirable outcome of the political system and environment in Hong Kong. It may also be a trend towards which many countries, whether developed or developing, have steered their system of policy-making in relation to VET. This paper will attempt to analyze the concept of a co-optative decision-making system in relation to VET by comparing it to the traditional mode of decentralized decision-making process, which had been put into place since the 1960s. An overview of the decision-making systems of 10 selected countries will be made in order to understand why and how the policies on VET may be formulated in the context of the diversity of social and political systems in these countries and yet still follow a general pattern of cooperation and rationalization among various stakeholders. These 10 representative countries are Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, India, Italy, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, and Switzerland. The decision-making systems of these 10 countries will be highlighted and compared with respect to the delivery of quality VET. Tables for comparison will be used as far as possible. To conclude the paper, a more refined decision-making system, which extends the ideas of the triple alliance but also incorporates the involvement of various stakeholders, is recommended to foster further development in quality VET.

Document Type

Conference Paper

 
Aug 6th, 12:00 AM

In search of a governance framework of vocational education and training for the 21st century: an international comparative study

Hong Kong Conventional & Exhibition Centre

This paper focuses on the governance framework in relation to the decision-making process which designs, moulds and formulates the policy on vocational education and training (VET) to meet the needs of various industrial and commercial sectors in Hong Kong. There has been a long history of an apparently close relationship among government, businessmen and academics who form a tripartite alliance in making decisions on VET within the framework of the government’s co-optation strategies. Such a triple alliance may be regarded as a necessary and desirable outcome of the political system and environment in Hong Kong. It may also be a trend towards which many countries, whether developed or developing, have steered their system of policy-making in relation to VET. This paper will attempt to analyze the concept of a co-optative decision-making system in relation to VET by comparing it to the traditional mode of decentralized decision-making process, which had been put into place since the 1960s. An overview of the decision-making systems of 10 selected countries will be made in order to understand why and how the policies on VET may be formulated in the context of the diversity of social and political systems in these countries and yet still follow a general pattern of cooperation and rationalization among various stakeholders. These 10 representative countries are Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, India, Italy, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, and Switzerland. The decision-making systems of these 10 countries will be highlighted and compared with respect to the delivery of quality VET. Tables for comparison will be used as far as possible. To conclude the paper, a more refined decision-making system, which extends the ideas of the triple alliance but also incorporates the involvement of various stakeholders, is recommended to foster further development in quality VET.